One Free Press Coalition Spotlights Journalists Under Attack

5. Miroslava Breach Velducea (Mexico)

Trial idling in murder case of Mexico City correspondent.

Trial is ongoing—with the next court date undetermined—for the suspected killer of La Jornada correspondent Miroslava Breach Velducea, who was murdered in March 2017 in connection to her reporting on links between politicians and organized crime. The Mexico City newspaper reported that a note reading “for being a snitch” was found at the scene. With five confirmed deaths this year, Mexico ranks as the deadliest country for the profession.

6. Shujaat Bukhari (India)

Suspects at large in shooting death of Indian editor.

Two police officers and Shujaat Bukhari, the founder and editor of Rising Kashmir newspaper, were shot and killed by several unidentified individuals outside Bukhari’s office in June 2018. He had recently written a piece for India’s Scroll news website, welcoming the government’s suspension of military operations against alleged terrorists during the month of Ramadan—and had approached a former chief official for “increased security.” Police identified four suspects, one who was later killed in a shootout; subsequent updates have stagnated.

7. Nafosat Olloshukurova (Uzbekistan)

Uzbek blogger held in detention and psychiatric care.

For the past month, Uzbek authorities have kept blogger Nafosat Olloshukurova in a Khorezm regional psychiatric center, following 10 days of detention on charges of petty hooliganism and participating in unauthorized assemblies. Her family has not seen or been able to contact her since September 23. She had been documenting journalist and poet Mahmud Rajabov’s march to the capital Tashkent to petition for dropping a criminal case against him.

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8. Mahmoud Hussein (Egypt)

Journalist’s pre-trial detention repeatedly extended in Egypt.

Mahmoud Hussein, a journalist working with Al Jazeera, has spent more than 1,000 days in pre-trial detention in Cairo’s Tora Prison Complex since his December 2016 arrest on anti-state and false news charges. His detention, which was initially pegged for 15 days, has been repeatedly renewed every 45 days and stems from a 2016 documentary about conscription in Egypt, which the government claims uses fake footage and aims to incite chaos.

9. Agba Jalingo (Nigeria)

Pending trial could carry life sentence for Nigerian publisher.

Eight days after his August 22 arrest in Lagos, Nigerian federal authorities charged Agba Jalingo, publisher of privately owned online news outlet CrossRiverWatch, with disturbance of public peace and treason for writings and social media posts about Governor Benedict Ayade. Courts are granting witnesses anonymity in closed testimony, calling into question the possibility of a fair trial. A guilty verdict for treason could sentence Jalingo to life in prison, while disturbance could carry up to three years.
Court date is October 30.

10. Martin Inoua Doulguet (Chad)

Fines and unequal punishment exacted upon Chadian newspaper leaders.

Martin Inoua Doulguet, director of Salam Info newspaper, is imprisoned awaiting a date to appeal his three-year sentence commenced in September following criminal charges of conspiracy and defamation brought by a former Chad government health official. The director of Le Moustik newspaper was found guilty of the same but received no jail time, while both are subjected to fines: each to pay one million Central African francs ($1,675) to the state and joint responsibility for 20 million francs ($33,514) in plaintiff damages.


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